Pope, Vice President, Faith, Kites

The faith of Abraham, the faith of the Church, the saving grace of life, the definitive gift of God: believing in Christ. Believing that God is good, loving, that He hears our prayers, that He forgives our sins, that He is our friend, that He wills our good, our ultimate success—our definitive, permanent success.

On Wednesday, Pope Benedict said:

I believe, then, that we must learn the simplest and most fundamental lessons of the Council, and that is that Christianity in its essence consists in faith in God, who is Trinitarian Love, and in a personal and communal encounter with Christ who orients and guides our lives. Everything else follows from this.

The important thing today, as was the desire of the Council Fathers, is that we see clearly and anew that God is present, that he is watching over us, that he responds to us, and that by contrast, when faith in God is found wanting, all that is essential crumbles, because man loses his profound dignity and what makes his humanity great… The Council reminds us that the Church, in all her members, has the task, the mandate, of transmitting the word of God’s saving love, so that the divine call that holds within itself our eternal beatitude may be heard and welcomed.

Yesterday, he continued:

If today the Church proposes a new Year of Faith and a new evangelization, it is not to honor an anniversary, but because there is more need of it, even more than there was fifty years ago!…

Recent decades have seen the advance of a spiritual ‘desertification.’ In the Council’s time it was already possible from a few tragic pages of history to know what a life or a world without God looked like, but now we see it every day around us. This void has spread. But it is in starting from the experience of this desert, from this void, that we can again discover the joy of believing.

Yesterday evening, the Vice President said on television that we Catholics hold de fide, that is by faith, that human life begins at conception. “But I would never impose my faith on anyone else.”

The first statement is untrue. The Church has never taught us when human life begins. We conclude by scientific reasoning that human life begins at conception. Believer and unbeliever alike agree that doing violence to innocent human beings is wrong.

What we Catholics believe lies at a much deeper level of truth. What we Catholics believe, what we Christians believe, is that every human being has the chance to get to heaven. We believe that doing good and avoiding evil is our way of being friends with Almighty God. We believe that God has a plan for every human being, that He loves every human being, that He made every human being for a reason

He knows the reason in His infinite wisdom, and He gradually reveals the glorious reason to us, with the beauty of every day that He gives, the air in our lungs–and the transcendent wisdom that grows in our own souls when we pray pray pray our way through life.

Pope says the world has become a spiritual desert. The water that the desert needs is our Catholic faith. We do not impose. We propose. And the truth of what we believe wins souls–like the wind makes kites fly.

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One thought on “Pope, Vice President, Faith, Kites

  1. Father Mark,

    A voice from the ’70s might prove instructive:

    A Horse With No Name

    Written by Dewey Bunnell, ©1971

    Performed by the band “America”

    “On the first part of the journey
    I was looking at all the life
    There were plants and birds and rocks and things
    There was sand and hills and rings
    The first thing I met was a fly with a buzz
    And the sky with no clouds
    The heat was hot and the ground was dry
    But the air was full of sound

    I’ve been through the desert on a horse with no name
    It felt good to be out of the rain
    In the desert you can remember your name
    ‘Cause there ain’t no one for to give you no pain
    La, la …

    After two days in the desert sun
    My skin began to turn red
    After three days in the desert fun
    I was looking at a river bed
    And the story it told of a river that flowed
    Made me sad to think it was dead

    You see I’ve been through the desert on a horse with no name
    It felt good to be out of the rain
    In the desert you can remember your name
    ‘Cause there ain’t no one for to give you no pain
    La, la …

    After nine days I let the horse run free
    ‘Cause the desert had turned to sea
    There were plants and birds and rocks and things
    there was sand and hills and rings
    The ocean is a desert with it’s life underground
    And a perfect disguise above
    Under the cities lies a heart made of ground
    But the humans will give no love

    You see I’ve been through the desert on a horse with no name
    It felt good to be out of the rain
    In the desert you can remember your name
    ‘Cause there ain’t no one for to give you no pain
    La, la … ”

    Now, your blog has put a face on the poor soul wandering through the desert after nine days under the burning Sun, delusional, misoriented, and misguiding. Still, it is interesting; the only thing out of place in the desert is us. As with so much of God’s creation, there is a place for everything; but to go meandering through, spouting off things as you’d like to have it, is out of place. It’s easy to get burned by such behavior; and, unfortunately, its very easy to begin believing your own lies. More unfortunately, the fervor and frequency of the lies might be mistaken as the truth by others, the unsuspecting. And, we know that there is a special end for those who mislead the little ones.

    No where has the “big tent” aspect of the Roman Catholic Church been more apparent than was the “debate” (more like a moderated diatribe) last evening, where two “Catholics” squared off, and delivered opinions on what was, in one case, what the speaker professed, and, in the other case, what the speaker asserted was Catholic theology. Only one thing was lacking; if only the former Speaker of the U. S. House of Representatives could have moderated. Then, we could have had a definitive judgement regarding the veracity whether what was presented was, or was not, “Catholic.”

    As to the notion that we cannot impose our will on another regarding abortion, if a man confronts you with a knife, and announces that he is going to kill you because he believes it is right, do you have a right to object? Do you have a duty to resist? If the same man were to announce that he is going to abort an infant in the womb, do you have a right to object? A duty to resist?

    We aren’t “in” the desert; we “are” the desert.

    In God we trust.

    LIH,

    joe

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