More Internet Lacunae: the 1980’s

Bright Lights Big City sunrise Michael J Fox

Does the internet have everything cool on it? No. The 1980’s are not really on the internet.

What could be cooler than Prince’s “Good Love,” as he originally recorded it in 1986? Can it be found anywhere on the interwebs? Negative.

What about when Steely Dan singer Donald Fagen covered Jimmy Reed “Bright Lights, Big City” for the closing scene of the movie version of the Jay McInerney novel of the same name? I defy you to find it.

(You can find “Century’s End” easily enough–and it’s worth it, totally worth it–but that is not the song I am talking about.)

How do you know time has passed? Like, in a big way?

When you see the light of the sunrise on the Twin Towers, while Michael J. Fox eats the loaf of bread he got in exchange for his horn-rimmed sunglasses and calls himself “you” for the last time–and you think to yourself, ‘I remember seeing that closing scene in the theatre, and concluding that the movie version sucked compared to the book, and I visited the roof deck of those very same towers multiple times after that movie came out–on various trips and wanderings around the Big Apple.

‘But my summer seminarian, who is a college graduate, considerably older than I was when I stayed up all night reading Bright Lights Big City cover-to-cover, on a school night during my junior year of high-school–this fine, full-grown young man who is staying with me for the summer–he has no real memory whatsoever of the Twin Towers even existing at all.’

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One thought on “More Internet Lacunae: the 1980’s

  1. Father Mark,

    I’ll just have to put up with “sounding old” (what the heck, I AM old): the youngsters of this generation live in the instant. In the past, that would have been considered the ideal, “carpe diem”. Now, it just means that they have NO sense of history; and we KNOW what that means. “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” [thank you George]

    But, now, the sot pickens, IF this generation has no sense of history, WHO didn’t give them that sense? Each generation has a duty to pass on to the next a coherent body of knowledge to help them make sense out of the confusing world into which they are being thrust. If we didn’t do that, SHAME on US!

    Admittedly, since the 1960’s there’s been a social message NOT to trust those in power, including our elders, and especially our parents (remember, your Dad said get into the car and you got; now-a-days, the kids are much more likely to ask, “Why?”). But, we still had the moral duty to instruct our children. Perhaps, it’s just a matter of our not being there — there is certainly enough of that going around.

    In a sense, our CHURCH seems to be suffering from a similar malaise. Could the causes be the same?

    In God we trust.

    LIH,

    joe

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