Sorrow of Mary

The sufferings which Christ endured atoned for all the sins of the human race. God suffered as a perfectly innocent man. And He suffered in body and soul more deeply than we can imagine. The Son offered to the Father the dereliction of His apparent abandonment.

God made the Virgin Mary the mother of the sacrificial Lamb. She raised Him with sublime tenderness. Then she had to witness the agony by which He consummated His mission. The Virgin Mary shared in the most intimate way in the dereliction of the crucified Son of God.

More than anyone else, she knew the purity of His innocence and the injustice of His death. More than anyone else, she sympathized with her Son’s intimacy with the heavenly Father. She stood closest when the Lord cried out, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Can anyone doubt that she would have preferred to die, rather than hear this?

But our Lady of sorrows gives us hope precisely because she knew such indescribable motherly pain. She has faced everything that we must endure; none of our sufferings are foreign to her. She greets them all with her patient faith.

She trusted in God even as she held her Son’s dead body in her arms. In the end, things turned out okay.

E Pluribus Unum (Easter Exegesis III)

pluribusIn Psalm 22, we sing: “I will praise you, Lord, in the assembly of your people.” “I will praise you, Lord, in the assembly of your people.”

This is our hymn. We sing it together. God made us to be together—to praise Him together, and to work together for His Kingdom.

The Lord Jesus told us: “I am the vine. You are the branches. You cannot bear fruit unless you remain on the vine.” (John 15:5) A vine has many branches, and the branches live and bear fruit together. Left alone, a branch detached from the vine withers and dies.

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