Compendium of John 6 Homilies + “How are you?”

Here are links to the homilies on John 6 that I have given:

deathstarIntroduction to John 6

“On Him, the Father, God, has set His seal.”

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, the Liturgy the Lord Gave Us

“Lord, to whom shall we go?”, The Former Way of Life

Bigger than Death, Dead Ancestors

The Kind Will of the Father

The Two Kinds of People Who Think We are Crazy

How He Gives Us His Flesh

…Plus, here is one of the funnier movie scenes.

Han and Luke (disguised as imperial stormtroopers) and Chewy have just commandeered the cellblock control station. They are rescuing Princess Leia from the Death Star jail.

Apparently, Harrison Ford ad-libbed his lines in this scene.

Seven Deadlies Compendium, Etc.

blondie

I woke up this morning feeling basically okay with myself. But then I discovered that I agree with Ken Woodward…(If the comic strips appearing here are too small for you to read, you can see a larger size by clicking on it.)

stoning…According to the Law of Moses, capital crimes were to be punished by stoning to death.

The first stones were to be cast by the witnesses upon whose testimony the guilty party was convicted. Then everyone else could join in the stoning. By this violent act, the injustice of the crime would be purged from the nation.

God is perfectly just. He examines every heart. Before Him, no one is innocent.

But He has not cast a stone and done violence to the guilty ones. Rather, He subjected Himself to violence at the hands of the unjust.

By this violent act, our injustice is purged. We are not condemned to death.

devilGod restores justice; we are pardoned; we may live.

…Here is a little compendium of my sermons on the seven deadly sins…

Pride

Greed and Envy

Anger and Lust

Gluttony and Sloth

chaliceAlso, there are some new Bests above.

And I added a new feature above…a collection of the collections.

…I wish I could say that I am willing to take the sins of others upon myself, like our Lord.

I can say this, though: I do take the germs of others upon myself.

This is what communion under both species means for the priest: Taking the germs of the entire people upon yourself.

Five Autumn Homilies on St. Paul’s Letters

mosaic-saint-paulI won’t be giving sermons for the next two Sundays because of the Archbishop’s Appeal.

It thought it might be helpful to put together a little compendium of the homilies I gave in the fall on St. Paul’s letters to the Philippians and Thessalonians.

Our continuous reading of these letters was interrupted by feasts that we kept in the fall. We wound up reading from Philippians on four Sundays and I Thessalonians once.

Philippians

St. Paul’s Favorite Church (chapter 1)

Encouraging the Apostle (Philippians 2:1-11)

Tremble and Trust (Philippians 4:6-7)

St. Paul did Correct the Philippians (Philippians 4:12-20)

I Thessalonians

The Beginning of the New Testament

Bonus! The Faithfulness of St. Paul

Bonus #2!! Colossians * “Seek the things that are above.”

Spiritual Reading Suggestion

 

 

This is my seventh semester taking one class at the Dominican House of Studies, trying to make my way towards a degree that would qualify me to teach in a seminary.  This morning my class for this semester met for the first time, and I had the experience I always do:  The syllabus is overwhelming and intimidating.  I wish that I had the time and energy to do all the reading, but I know that I will only be able to eke out a fraction of it and try to do enough to get by in the class.

 

Today is also the day we remember at Holy Mass the greatest teacher in the history of the Church, St. Augustine.  If you are looking for a good book for spiritual reading, order The Essential Sermons of St. Augustine.  It is published by New City Press. They definitely have it on Barnes and Noble; I imagine they have it on all the book websites.  It was published just about a year ago.

 

I am not enough of a Latin scholar to comment knowledgeably about translations, but I know enough to say that this translation is something special.  It is not just readable; it offers a delightful insight into St. Augustine’s incredibly knowledgeable and loving mind.